Drafting new offshore wind technical standards in China

Friday, 2 June, 2017 - 13:00
World Bank selects a consortium to support offshore wind technical standards in China. (Photo: DNV GL)
World Bank selects a consortium to support offshore wind technical standards in China. (Photo: DNV GL)

DNV GL is the only foreign owned company engaged by the Chinese government in the developing of new offshore wind technical standards.

DNV GL, the world’s largest resource of independent energy experts and certification body, announced that it is part of a consortium selected by the World Bank to support the development of three new offshore wind technical standards in China. The standards will include offshore wind turbine support structures, offshore substations and offshore wind farm power cables. DNV GL will also be advising the Chinese government on project financing and risk management as part of this project.
This project is part of the China Renewable Energy Scale-up Program (CRESP) developed by the Government of China in cooperation with the World Bank, and the Global Environment Facility to support the implementation of a renewable energy policy development and investment program in China. Based on their local & international experience in offshore wind, DNV GL was invited by the China Renewable Energy Engineering Institute (CREEI) and the East China Investigation and Design Institute (ECIDI) to join the tender.

“Offshore Wind is a very demanding technology. Standards are crucial to minimize the risks to acceptable and bankable levels, and learning from the international experience as this mandate is supporting, is a great approach to accelerate a successful industry,” said Mathias Steck, ‎Executive Vice President for DNV GL’s Energy business in Asia Pacific.

DNV GL / Silke Funke

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