New multipurpose vessel on the way

Monday, 11 January, 2016 - 10:30
The multipurpose vessel Living Stone is being built by the Spanish shipyard LaNaval near Bilbao where recently the keel laying ceremony took place. (Graphic: DEME)
The multipurpose vessel Living Stone is being built by the Spanish shipyard LaNaval near Bilbao where recently the keel laying ceremony took place. (Graphic: DEME)

DEME has announced the keel laying for its new multipurpose vessel Living Stone. It will be able to accommodate up to 100 people and will serve turbine as well as cable installation. Ship delivery is planned for 2017.

DEME has started the construction of the multipurpose vessel Living Stone. The vessel is being built by the Spanish shipyard LaNaval near Bilbao where recently the keel laying ceremony took place. The Living Stone will be delivered in 2017.

The Living Stone features DP3 (Dynamic Positioning 3) capability together with a total loading capacity of 12,500 tons. It will be equipped with two large 5,000 tons cable/umbilical carrousels arranged below deck allowing for a free deck space of approx. 3,500 m² which accommodates the modular cable/umbilical handling systems, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), the subsea trenching tool CBT 1100 and the fall-pipe system. A central moon pool of 7.7 m by 7.7 m and the installation of a 600 ton crane for subsea installation and removal complete this arrangement. The new vessel will be able to accommodate up to 100 people and will serve transport and installation projects as well as offshore power cable and umbilical installation, interconnectors for the future European super grid amongst others.

The Living Stone has been designed with “dual fuel” main engines with LNG being its prime fuel. LNG, biodegradable grease and oil will be used combined with heat recovery. The aim is to reduce the vessel’s emissions and waste so that the overall environmental burden from shipping is reduced. The Living Stone will be another DEME vessel equipped with dual fuel engines, in addition to the self-propelled jack-up vessel Apollo and three other hopper dredgers that have been ordered. Furthermore, it will join the fleet of fall-pipe vessels of DEME's offshore division Tideway which currently includes the Flintstone, Rollingstone and Seahorse

Katharina Garus / DEME

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